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Journal of Pharmacognosy and Phytochemistry

Journal of Pharmacognosy and Phytochemistry

Vol. 12, Issue 3 (2023)

Ethno-botanical, ethno-pharmacological and phytochemical characterization of tiger nut nutritional tubers cultivated and marketed in Benin

Author(s):

Zérach Jésugnon Noukpozounkou, Balbine Fagla Amoussou, Nicodème Chabi and Paulin Azokpota

Abstract:

Yellow nutsedge (Cyperus esculenstus) is a weed plant with significant phytotherapeutic benefits. This work has made it possible to characterize through an ethnobotanical and ethnopharmacological survey the tiger nut tubers grown and marketed in Benin and to investigate the major phytochemical families contained therein. Thus, the two objectives aim to characterize tiger nut tubers through an ethnobotanical and ethnopharmacological survey and to investigate the major phytochemical families contained in tiger nut tubers. The methodology adopted consisted of carrying out a survey in different environments identified by stratified sampling techniques based on a prepared and corrected questionnaire. Then, the phytochemical screening is carried out on the tubers and the leaves of the variety according to the 3 varieties considered. The 100 survey respondents are made up of 42% of Otamari followed by 21% of Idaacha, 16% of Ditamaris, 12% of baribas and 9% of M'bèrèmè whose modal age class is represented by the 45-59 age group. As for ethnobotanical knowledge, reproductive problems account for more than 54% of the causes of tiger nut consumption, followed by 18% of problems relating to the digestive tract, increased blood, stomach aches and lactation. Then the treatment consists in consuming tubers directly with a percentage of 62%. As for the dosage of use, tiger nut tubers can be tied to the neck, chewed or infused. 24% of respondents say that to treat diseases from tiger nut, you have to use the beads to make a necklace and attach it to your neck. 45% believe that the best way to treat diseases from nutsedge is to chew the tubers and spit out the fibers. As for the remaining 31%, they think that tiger nut tubers should be infused and take 1 glass a day. It appears from the phytochemical screening that all three varieties contain 3 chemical groups, namely: Reducing compounds; Mucilages and Steroids. But unlike the other two varieties, the black one also contains a fourth compound, Leuco anthocyanes. Moreover, none of the three varieties does not contain toxic compounds such as cyanogenic derivatives and cardiotonic glycosides. The consumption of tiger nut leaves could induce health risks. On the other hand, the consumption of tubers does not present any risk. In addition, black tubers have the ability to eliminate free radicals in addition to those common to different varieties.

Pages: 140-149  |  317 Views  157 Downloads


Journal of Pharmacognosy and Phytochemistry Journal of Pharmacognosy and Phytochemistry
How to cite this article:
Zérach Jésugnon Noukpozounkou, Balbine Fagla Amoussou, Nicodème Chabi and Paulin Azokpota. Ethno-botanical, ethno-pharmacological and phytochemical characterization of tiger nut nutritional tubers cultivated and marketed in Benin. J Pharmacogn Phytochem 2023;12(3):140-149.

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