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Journal of Pharmacognosy and Phytochemistry

Journal of Pharmacognosy and Phytochemistry

Vol. 9, Special Issue 6 (2020)

Biotic and abiotic stress management in scientific cultivation of Mango (Mangifera indica L.) for sustainable yield and quality with environmental safety

Author(s):

Mamta Kumari, Anjani Kumar Singh and Krishankant Dubey

Abstract:
The climate change scenarios predict pronounced modification of the climate in the coming decades. Climate change is therefore great concern agriculture will have to cope with in the coming century. Since a few decades, several research teams around the world carry out a huge work to model the future climatic change during the 21st century, based on several scenarios of greenhouse gas emission. We have to expect rise in average temperatures, in atmospheric CO2 concentration, in soil salinity in some areas, and lower and more irregular rainfall. The climate variability and the frequency of extreme events have greatly affected the overall yield of mango in the country. Mango is one of the common fruit in most continents, particularly in Asia, Central and South America and Africa. Global production of mangoes is concentrated mainly in Asia and more precisely in India which produces an average of 15 million t (MT) a year. Mangoes are now growing in more than 100 countries of which more than 65 countries produce each more than 1,000 MT a year. There is wide gap between yield & profitability. It is due to poor management practices, biotic and abiotic stresses round the year particularly in flowering and fruiting period. Biotic factors like attack of red banded caterpillar, Madhua kit, powdery mildew, mango fruit fly attack. Abiotic stresses are high temperature in January, rain in November – December, high temperature followed by low temperature causes blackening of flowers, westerly wind in January month causes huge loss of flowers particularly early variety like Bombay, Jardalu, Gulabkhas. Rain in November December tends towards vegetative growth in place of flowering. Late flowering leads to delayed harvesting of fruits hits 300 crores of annual export market (The Hindu 2020). Working in Krishi Vigyan Kendra, Bhagalpur from 2009 to till date a keen observation is made on effect of climate change and indiscriminate management practices with no safeguard for environment. To combat the effect of biotic and abiotic factors study and observation revealed balance dose of fertilizer, proper management of insect and pest, suitable intercrop and use of wind break can be able to mitigate the problems. Farmers are able to harvest good quality of crops and fetch higher prices in the market.

Pages: 392-396  |  1780 Views  997 Downloads

How to cite this article:
Mamta Kumari, Anjani Kumar Singh and Krishankant Dubey. Biotic and abiotic stress management in scientific cultivation of Mango (Mangifera indica L.) for sustainable yield and quality with environmental safety. J Pharmacogn Phytochem 2020;9(6S):392-396.

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